Roger Waters’ The Wall, Reviewed

As the concert date approaches, I looked for some reviews on Roger Waters’ performance of The Wall.  This review from the Hartford Courant seems pretty typical.  It sounds like it will be a visually interesting, musically exciting show.

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Politics not as Usual

I made an effort to try and watch the final debate between Strickland and Kasich in hopes that it would help me make up my mind on who to vote for, but it put me to sleep. Both candidates used the same old political jargons, refused to answer the questions posed to them, gave no specifics and resorted to personal attacks.

Last night New York had their Governor’s Debate and it was a much more lively affair. I have to admit I wish Jimmy McMillan was running for Governor of Ohio because I think it would make a whole lot more sense to vote for him.   

Goodbye June Cleaver

Leave it to Beaver cast

I saw over the weekend that Barbara Billingsley passed away who fondly played June Cleaver the mother on Leave it to Beaver (LITB). LITB (1957 – 1963) was one of a trifecta of shows on television in the late fifties and early sixties whose premise was to follow the lives of a suburban American family which consisted of a working dad, a stay at home mom and their happy children. 

LITB was different than the other two sitcom’s because Ozzie and Harriett (1952-1966) and Father Knows Best (1954-1960) had plots that revolved around the parents whereas LITB plots mostly revolved around their eight year old son Beaver who would get himself in some kind of a mess. The moral of each story always being good behavior brings rewards while bad behavior brings undesirable consequences.

Here’s a clip from one of the episodes where Beaver’s friend Whitey dares him to find out if the cup on the billboard sign actually has soup in it. Tony Dow who played Beaver’s brother Wally said that if any line got too much of a laugh the writers would take it our because they only wanted chuckles.

Our brother in law Alec was an avid fan of the show when it was in reruns during the early eighties.

Debt, Debt, And More Debt

Recent figures from the Treasury Department shows that the national debt of the United States is now $13.665 trillion.  It is an unimaginably large amount.  In numeric form, it comes out to $13,665,000, 000,000. How are our kids and grandkids going to pay off such a huge sum?

There is plenty of blame to go around for this appalling debt predicament.  According to the Treasury Department, during President George W. Bush’s eight years in office, the national debt increased by $4.9 trillion.  During President Obama’s two years in office, the debt has increased by another $3 trillion.  Both parties bear responsibility — or more accurately, irresponsibility — for this glut of debt, which has turned the United States into a debtor nation and imposed soaring interest costs that will make it virtually impossible to balance our budget and pay down that debt in the future.

Everyone seems to agree that our debt and constant borrowing is unsustainable, but no one seems to be doing anything about it.  President Obama apparently is waiting for the recommendations of a bipartisan commission, and every other politician is too busy running for office to take any action.  The  lack of action on even basic appropriations bills this past session shows that, for this Congress, hard work and hard choices on the federal budget is just not a priority.

What does all of this mean for the upcoming election if you are a voter who, like me, thinks there is no more important issue for our nation than bringing the federal budget under control?  I think it gives rise to the “throw the bums out” view UJ noted in his recent post.  Democrats control the White House and have huge majorities in both Houses of Congress, and they’ve failed to take any meaningful action on what should be our highest priority.  Why not give the Republicans a chance and then, if they fail, try something else?  Nothing that has happened in the last two years indicates that a Democratic-controlled Congress will tackle federal spending or debt issues, and if we wait too much longer to do anything about the debt issue it may be too late.