Port Lucaya, Bahamas, December 28

We are down in the Bahamas, visiting friends near Freeport.  Today it was a lovely day, with blue skies and temperatures in the high 70s.  We went out in our friends’ boat for a cruise and some idle hours in the sunshine, and the marina where our friends dock their boat was a beautiful scene.

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Voyager 1, In “Cosmic Purgatory”

Someday soon, NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft will reach a milestone.  Somewhere out beyond the orbits of Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, 11 billion miles from the Sun, Voyager 1 is getting ready to pass the outer boundaries of our solar system and enter into a region of interstellar space that scientists have dubbed “cosmic purgatory.”

Consider this:  Voyager 1 was launched in 1977.   When its mission began, Jimmy Carter was President, disco was king, the Vietnam War was fresh in everyone’s memory, and I hadn’t even celebrated my 21st birthday.  A lot has happened in the intervening years, but all the while Voyager 1 has steadily journeyed through the solar system, exploring Jupiter and Saturn and otherwise performing its mission.  It’s still doing so, nearly 35 years later, moving at 11 miles per second and continuing to transmit data about the the solar wind and other conditions in the outer reaches of the solar system.

Voyager 1 will now venture out into unknown regions of the Milky Way, broadcasting its signal and becoming the first man-made object to leave the reaches of our solar system.  It will continue to broadcast until its power and fuel run out — which is not expected to happen until at least 2020.  Maybe disco will be back in vogue by then.

Sunglasses, By The Masses

Yesterday Kish and I were at a store and she bought two new pairs of sunglasses. It’s a familiar scene.  By my rough estimate, with these two new additions, Kish has now owned 3,461 pairs of sunglasses during our years of wedded bliss.

Unfortunately, the life spans of those unlucky eyewear items tend to be as fleeting as that of the common mayfly.  They inevitably end up lost, or destroyed, or otherwise discarded, left to join their brethren in the Great Sunglasses Beyond, where they fondly reminisce about their brief but crucial days of service in shielding the eyes of sensitive humans from the sun’s cruel glare.

If these two new pairs of sunglasses turn out to be anything like their predecessors, their likely fate is as follows:

Left on a restaurant table — 10%

Pulverized by heavy items in an enormous handbag — 15%

Chewed to smithereens by Penny — 22%

Fallen apart after cheap screw falls out of flimsy frame and can’t be found, even with use of magnifying glass — 17%

Inexplicably lost within 48 hours of purchase — 35.9%

Last long enough to become unfashionable — .1%