Growing Ancient Fruit, Thanks To Our Friends The Squirrels

Scientists in Siberia have discovered and grown ancient fruit — thanks to some Arctic ground squirrels that lived thousands of years before the end of the last Ice Age.

The squirrels had stashed the fruit in their burrows dug deep into the permafrost.  The fruit quickly froze and has remained frozen for 30,000 years.  The squirrel burrows were left undisturbed and were apparently discovered by people looking for the remains of mammoths and other Ice Age creatures.  Scientists took the frozen fruit and, using advanced techniques, have been able to grow plants from the fruit remains — making the fruit, from a plant called Silene Stenophylla, by far the oldest plant material brought back to life after an extended period of dormancy.  The discovery gives scientists hope that they might be able to find, and revive, the frozen remains of extinct Arctic region plants.

Who knows what happened to the squirrels that originally stashed the fruit?  Perhaps they were eaten by a stray saber-tooth tiger or some other Ice Age predator.  But their pack-rat storage habits have allowed scientists to bring an ancient plant back to life — and have given new meaning to the notion of squirreling things away.

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Following The Kidney Chain

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that there are wonderful people living in the world.  It’s great when you are reminded that the world is filled with decent, kind people who will help you if they possibly can.

Consider the story of the longest recorded organ donation chain, which just ended.  It began when a Good Samaritan from California named Rick Russamenti decided to donate one of his kidneys to help a stranger.  His kidney went to a New Jersey man whose family wanted to donate one of their kidneys but did not have an appropriate match — so a family member donated a kidney to go a stranger instead, and the chain began.  Thereafter, over four months and 11 states, the chain cross-crossed the United States, and 30 patients received kidneys from 30 living donors.  The chain ended only when the last kidney recipient had no family or friends who could make a donation.

It’s hard to think of many acts more selfless than donating a kidney to a stranger, because you never know when you might need that kidney yourself.  The fact that 30 people were willing to do so says something heart-warming about modern America.

It’s Their Loss

A recent study reported that fewer nations are modeling their constitutions on the U.S. Constitution.  In the ’60s and ’70s, new constitutions were patterned on the American version, but that apparently is no longer the case.

The explanation for this trend is that our Constitution is miserly when it comes to guaranteeing “rights.”  Popular “rights” found in other constitutions, but not ours, include women’s rights, the right to work, the right to education, and the right to strike or unionize.  On the other hand, our Constitution provides for the right to keep and bear arms, whereas most modern constitutions do not.

The implication of the study is that our Constitution is somehow passe.  In the “rights race,” we’re falling behind!  We’re not keeping up with modern trends followed by enlightened nations everywhere!

Is anyone really troubled by this?  Ours was the first true written constitution, and it has served us well.  Other nations have them because our form of government has served as a model.  But there is a big difference between writing words on paper and actually living up to the concepts they express.  History shows that lofty ideals often are written in the otherwise ignored “constitutions” of repressive regimes.

Let’s not forget, either, that our Constitution was designed to sketch our government, its officers, and its functioning in broad strokes, allowing for flexibility and development over time.  In contrast, the “constitutions” described in the study sound more like statute books that leave little room for creativity and the need to respond to unexpected circumstances — like a crappy economy that interferes with the “right to work.”  The Greek Constitution, for example, includes “right to work” provisions.  How’s that working out for Greeks these days?

So, I don’t care if our Constitution has fallen out of favor with the camp followers who are drafting constitutions these days.  I’ll listen when their so-called “constitutions” have endured for 225 years, survived a civil war, and allowed their countries to become the most prosperous, democratic countries on Earth.