The Bell Event Centre

IMG_4028The wedding that Kish and I attended last night was held in the Bell Event Centre in Cincinnati.  It is a stunningly beautiful facility, with an interesting history.  The ceremony was held in the former St. Paul’s Church, which is home to extraordinary stained glass windows, fabulous frescoes, a vaulted ceiling, and stunning tile work — some of which I tried to capture with my camera.  After the ceremony, the guests moved outside briefly for refreshments and hors d’oeuvres, and then returned to find that the church had been converted into a reception hall complete with a wooden dance floor.

What a neat facility!  It’s a shame that the lovely cathedral no longer functions as a church (it was decommissioned during the 1970s) but I am glad it is still being used and is available for the public to enjoy.

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From The Same Species As Einstein

IMG_4019Last night, as Kish and I were on our way down to Cincinnati, we saw this shining example of human intellectual capacity on I-270.  The fellow in the back not only was standing in the bed of the pick-up truck traveling about 65 m.p.h. on a busy highway, he was using one hand to hold the brim of his ball cap so that it wouldn’t fly off.

Do you think he’s registered to vote?

In Defense Of Marriage — For Everyone

Last night Kish and I attended the wedding of a friend’s daughter.  It was a lovely ceremony.  We heard, once again, the familiar words of St. Paul’s epistle about love and the importance of selfless commitment in loving human relationships.

IMG_4033Those of us in the audience who are happily married reflected, once again, on how fortunate we are to have found someone with whom we can share our lives.  Marriage allows us to make the ultimate pledge to our loved one and to go forward as partners.  There is no doubt that successful marriages enrich the lives of both spouses.  They say that two heads are better than one, and it’s true . . . but then, for the most part, two people are better than one.  It’s wonderful to have that special lover, partner, and friend that you can confide in and consult with, who will gently coach you on how to smooth your rough edges, who will work and sacrifice to make your collective lives better, and who will always have your back.  You can’t help but feel a certain blessed, happy pride that you are part of such a relationship.

When you get married, you don’t necessarily think about the legal aspects of the decision, but they nevertheless are part of the bedrock on which marriages are built.  Marriage is a legal commitment that, once undertaken, can only be undone by another legal action.  The legal aspect gives marriage a formality that distinguishes it from more casual relationships.  And the other legal benefits and rights that go with marriage — be they tax breaks, insurance advantages, pension preferences, or one of the many other consequences built into federal and state law, 401(k) plans, and the other welter of documents and provisions that govern modern life — make working together as a team much, much easier.

I’m a big fan of marriage, and I think it should be encouraged whenever couples have decided, after mature reflection, that they have found that special person.  That’s why I support same-sex marriage.  Marriage has made my life immeasurably better.  Why shouldn’t every couple, regardless of their sexual orientation, have the same opportunity for lifelong happiness?