Marriage And Money

How much of a successful marriage is attributable to what money can buy?  Do good marriages now carry a price tag that working class Americans cannot afford?

Those are some of the questions explored in a scholarly paper that looks at work and marriage in working class and middle class families.  A Slate article on the paper contrasts the stories of two families.  A Mom in Ohio works at a minimum wage job and has had two failed marriages, one to a man who left and another to a man who beat her; her 20-year-old daughter also has had an abusive relationship and is now dating a guy in jail.  Neither wants to get married soon.  The middle-class family in the Pacific northwest, on the other hand, can afford weekends at a vacation cabin, annual travel, and building a barn and buying a horse for their daughter who had begun “acting out” and then enrolling her in a private school involving horses.

The paper, Intimate Inequalities: Love and Work in a Post-Industrial Landscape, is based on interviews and surveys of more than 300 Americans.  It focuses on job stability and security.  Secure middle-class couples can afford luxury items like vacations and gym memberships that keep their marriages viable, whereas working class people who don’t have stable sources of income are more concerned with keeping a job and their own survival than with providing materially and socially for others.

I have no doubt that economic uncertainty and loss of a job can provide additional stress that can turn a rocky marriage into a divorce.  The two stories in the Slate article, however, also suggest that other, more important factors can come into play.  Marriages simply don’t last when one spouse is physically abusive, no matter how many horses a couple can afford.  Men who can’t make a long-term commitment aren’t going to make good husbands, regardless of socioeconomic class.  Dating guys who are in jail probably isn’t a good recipe for a stable and satisfying married life.  Serial philanderers, people with emotional problems, and others who are ill-suited for marriage similarly are found at all income levels.

There’s something a bit off-putting, too, in the implicit suggestion that successful marriages are primarily about money, rather than love and compatibility.  Depicting marriage as primarily an economic arrangement that people will endure because it allows them to take nice vacations inevitably discounts the essential emotional component of a strong marriage.

Sometimes marriages end in divorce because people grow apart over time; sometimes they fail because people just exercised poor judgment in getting married to people who weren’t suitable in the first place.  Money woes and job concerns may be a factor in some instances, but I think successful marriages are about a lot more than what is in the bank account.

3 thoughts on “Marriage And Money

  1. We had more fun when we had less money. I think a lot of couples would say they enjoyed the building years of their marriages when the smallest acquisition was a trumpet heralding triumph. Love thrives in a partnership, working together toward a common goal is more important than how much money is in the bank.

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