Presidents And Pocket Change

Today is President’s Day. I celebrated by looking at the the change in my pocket — and wondering about the history of placement of Presidents on our nation’s coinage.

Of course, now there are Presidents on every coin we use regularly. (I’m not counting the Sacajawea dollar, the Susan B. Anthony dollar, or some of the other oddball coins that have come into being recently.) Abraham Lincoln is on the penny, Thomas Jefferson on the nickel, Franklin Roosevelt on the dime, George Washington on the quarter, and John F. Kennedy on the half dollar. That’s been the roster on U.S. coins since the 1960s, when President Kennedy replaced Ben Franklin on the 50-cent piece.

Although Presidents have been on all of the American coins in common circulation for most of my adult lifetime, it wasn’t always that way. In fact, no American President appeared on a circulating coin for the first 140 years of our history. Most American coins featured depictions of Liberty, or native Americans, or native animals, or a combination of the same.

The first President to appear on a coin was Lincoln, who knocked a native American off the penny in 1909. He was joined by the Father of our Country in 1932, when George Washington replaced a Liberty figure on the quarter, by Thomas Jefferson in 1938, when the Sage of Monticello took his place on the five-cent piece and the classic buffalo nickel was discontinued, and then by Franklin Roosevelt, whose visage replaced the Mercury dime in 1945.

I’m not opposed to honoring Presidents, but I’d like to see American coins go back to recognizing themes rather than individuals. Coins like the liberty penny, the buffalo nickel, and the walking Liberty half dollar were beautiful, and aspirational. Our current coins are pretty boring by comparison.

When College Graduates Move Back With Their Parents

Last week Gallup released some survey data that deserved more attention than it actually received. The survey indicated that, in the United States, 14 percent of adults aged 24 to 34 live with their parents. What’s more, 51 percent of young adults aged 18 to 23 live with their parents. Put them together, and almost one-third of American adults under the age of 35 live with their parents.

As the Gallup report linked above indicates, there are many potential causes for this phenomenon. Some young adults, for example, may be helping to care for their aging or infirm parents. But deep down, we all know what the real cause is — the job market for young people is terrible, and many college graduates have obtained their diplomas at the price of a huge amount of debt. If you can’t get a job that covers the cost of housing, allows you to service your student loans, and leaves a little money left for living expenses, you don’t really have a choice. Inexorable financial necessity drives the decision.

The reality exposed by the Gallup survey is why so many of us have difficulty accepting the gradual decline in the unemployment rate as real evidence of an improving economy. We all know too many smart, capable, motivated college graduates who have had to move back in with their parents to try to make ends meet while they look for a job. It’s not what they — or their parents — envisioned when then went off to college.

The Gallup piece ends with a paragraph that begins: “A key question is to what extent those living at home are better off or worse off than their contemporaries who are out on their own, and what implications that has for society in general and the economy in particular.” Gallup promises to explore this question in a future report, but I think I can predict the findings — young adults who live with their parents probably eat better but are less satisfied than their friends who have found a job and are living on their own. People want to be independent, and the surest indication of independence is maintaining your own place. Mom’s home-cooked meals are nice and the comforts of home are pleasant, but young people who have to move back into their old rooms to make ends meet have to be frustrated and worried about their careers and their futures.

The Last Frigid Morning

IMG_1786Today it was 9 degrees when I went out for my morning walk. The mounds of plowed snow were crystallized in the cold air and glittering under the light of street lamps and the distant glimmer of the Moon.

But according to the weather app on my iPhone, we are in for some relief. Today the high temperature is supposed to inch above freezing, tomorrow the low temperature will be in the balmy 30s, and Thursday . . . well, on Thursday we’re supposed to get rain and the temperature is supposed to reach the 50s. (Rain, for those of you who had forgotten, is like liquid snow.)

The 50s! We’ll have massive snow melt, of course, but we’ll trade it gladly for reaching such sultry heights.