Roots Music

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A washboard and thimble, a harmonica, and steel guitar. Lots of people on the dance floor at the Blue Nile.

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Beauty On The Fence Line

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Today we walked through the Marigny Faubourg neighborhood to Bywater, in search of two junk shops Russell wanted to visit. We didn’t find anything worth buying among the piles of junk, but it was fun to see some of New Orleans’ neighborhoods. Marigny Faubourg, in particular, is a place where you can find beauty and color around every corner.

Men’s Bathrooms, Ladies’ Bathrooms

Women may not realize this, but ladies’ rooms are almost mythical places to many men.

We’ve heard tales of the pink palatial rooms that are kept spotlessly clean and equipped with chaise lounges and other luxurious features. But we haven’t seen them, of course — they’re forbidden territory.

There’s nothing mythical about men’s rooms, however. This photo of the facilities at one of the joints along Frenchmen Street gives you an idea of what to expect.

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El DeOrazio And Friends

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The first act on tonight’s music crawl on Frenchmen Street was El DeOrazio & Friends. Wow, were these guys fantastic! The pumped out terrific blues riffs, and DeOrazio is a spectacular guitarist. What a treat to sit within five feet of a great group and enjoy live music!

They were so good I bought one of the CDs. Support local music!

Almost The Toughest Job In Town

President Obama announced today that Jay Carney is resigning as his press secretary.  Carney had been press secretary for three years.  He’ll be replaced in the position by the appropriately named Josh Earnest.

Carney was the Washington bureau chief for Time magazine before he took the press secretary job, but apparently he had flackery in his blood:  he worked as communications director for Vice President Biden during the first two years of the Obama Administration.

I’m not sure why anyone would want to be the press secretary for any President.  It’s a thankless and often humiliating job.  On most days, you’re droning out agenda items, hoping to get the press corps interested in the latest boring policy initiative or presidential speech.  When crises hit, or scandals erupt, you’re the point person who needs to go out and face the questioning so the President doesn’t have to.  In those instances everyone knows that you’re spinning the news like crazy to try to make your boss look good.  Your credibility ends up taking a licking, and often you end up looking like an idiot in exchanges with the press that then get posted on YouTube.

I suppose the lure of being an insider is part of the attraction, but I’d like to think that actual journalists have too much self-respect to cross over to the other side and put their personal credibility on the line for a politician.