Our Tiny TV

We own a 40-inch flat-screen TV.  We didn’t buy it; we inherited it.  It seems plenty big to me, lets us watch our favorite HBO shows, and neatly fills one corner of our family room.

IMG_6233By comparison to what’s being sold these days, though, our set is shrimpy and passe.  Samsung now offers a 78-inch curved screen TV — that’s almost twice as large as ours — and other manufacturers are churning out TVs with more than 50- and 60-inch screens.  Big-screen TVs are the growth area in otherwise flat TV sales. Believe it or not, some people are willing to spend more than $1,000 for large-screen units that include internet connection capabilities and that will serve as the focal points of family rooms and, apparently, family life.

I recognize that fast-moving sports like pro football look great on a large, high-definition, flat screen TV, but aren’t we getting a bit carried away here?  Laying out more than a grand on a huge set that takes up an entire wall of a room seems excessive.

Advertisements

Taking Down Trees

IMG_6222Lately they’ve been taking down trees along the Yantis Loop and Route 62.  It’s a sad occasion for the walkers, cyclists, and joggers who use the path.

For the most part, the now-missing trees weren’t the kind of beautiful, spreading trees about which Joyce Kilmer might wax rhapsodic.  Instead, many were what Kish would call “field trees” — the kind of scrawny trees that farmers might use to visibly mark the boundaries between one field and another.  Still, they provided some shade, protection from the elements, screening from the roadway and the noise of passing cars, and the sense that you were walking through a rustling tunnel of green leafiness.

Now they are gone, and there are just sorry, straw-covered spots on the ground where the trees once stood.  As I said, it’s a sad occasion.