Real Irish

IMG_1531It’s St. Patrick’s Day, and in downtown Columbus there is a parade today.  Virtually every American city has one, and many cities — Savannah, Pittsburgh, Chicago, New York — lay claim to having the biggest, beeriest, blowout celebration next to Boston.

But what about St. Patrick’s Day in Ireland?  It just so happens that Kish and her sister, the Long Beach Recent Retiree, are there on the Emerald Isle as we speak, kicking out the jams with the residents of Galway and celebrating the saint who drove the snakes from Ireland — or whatever he’s supposed to have done.

The photo above is of the Galway parade, and the gray building in the background is the Lynch Castle (now the branch of a bank) which dates from the 1600s.  The bar scene below is from one of the many pubs that the sisters have decided to visit — purely to get a clinical sense of what an Irish St. Patrick’s Day celebration is like.  Pay no attention to those empty glasses of Guinness and apparent tumblers of whiskey!

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The Columbus Top Six

The Brown Bear, a faithful reader of the Wall Street Journal, alerted some of us to a Journal article that includes Columbus in a list of “6 great small cities for food lovers” and identifies six great food options for the lucky residents of Ohio’s flagship city.  The Journal‘s six Columbus choices are The Refectory, Skillet, Basi Italia, Wolf’s Ridge Brewing, Katalina, and Ajumama.

I’ve got no quibble with the restaurants on the list, although I haven’t been to Katalina yet.  In fact, I’ve written about my excellent omelet at Skillet, the delicious toad in the hole at Wolf’s Ridge Brewing, and the mid-boggling amdong chicken at Ajumama, pictured at right.  The Refectory has long been a Columbus gastronomic landmark — its oyster soup may be the best soup this committed soupophile has ever tasted — and Basi Italia is a favorite of our friends the Bahamians where we’ve always had great meals.  I also commend the Journal for including a food truck, Ajumama, among the six choices.  I’m a huge fan of the Columbus food truck culture, whether found at Dinin’ Hall or the annual food truck festival, and I’m glad to see one of their number get a deserving nod in the pantheon of foodie destinations.

No, the problem with the list is who’s not on it.  No G. Michael’s?  No Rigsby’s?  No Indian Oven?  No shiznite from the Green Meanie?  And what about Alana’s, or the Black Creek Bistro?  They’re all deserving choices, too.

A list of six just isn’t enough to do justice to the great foodie options in Columbus.  And one other thing about the Journal article:  it says Columbus isn’t well known for its dining scene — yet.  Says who, WSJ?