The View From Our Backyard

 We didn’t see all of the Red, White & Boom fireworks extravaganza in downtown Columbus, but we saw and heard enough to scare the dickens out of Kasey — and we didn’t have to leave our backyard.  And then we were treated to stray fireworks exhibitions in our neighborhood, too.

Happy Fourth of July, everyone!

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Kolache Republic

IMG_5973Well, on the day before we celebrate the founding of the American Republic, Kish and I discovered Kolache Republic.  It was a pleasant discovery, indeed.

Kolache Republic is one of those restaurants that you hear about through word of mouth.  It’s located in an unassuming brick building on South High Street, on the western edge of German Village.  It’s legendary among German Villagers for serving the best inexpensive breakfast in town.  We’ve been meaning to give it a try, and today we finally got there.

IMG_5976Unfortunately, we did not get there in time for breakfast.  Kolache Republic is one of those places that makes its fare and sells it, and when it’s gone — it’s gone.  By the time we arrived around noon, the breakfast kolaches were gone.

Fortunately, however, the KR was still serving lunch, and that meant that one of the two stalwarts running the shop told me about the Cuban sandwich kolache, made with shredded pulled pork and sausage.  The meat is baked inside the bread, and the result is incredibly moist and flavorful.  Served with some spicy, bright-tasting mustard sauce on the side, it was ridiculously good — in fact, it was one of the best meat and bread concoctions I’ve had in years.  It was so good I can’t wait to spring it on Dr. Science, who usually is the person who is in-the-know on great restaurants that are off the beaten path.  And, the Cuban sandwich kolache was a downright bargain at only $6.95.

The whole meal, which also included a blueberry and sweet cheese kolache, a pecan kolache, and two excellent cups of coffee, was a steal at about $15.00.  It made me more than happy to contribute to the “college fund” tip jar next to the register.

As I said, Kolache Republic is one of those hidden gems that you hear about only through word of mouth.  Consider yourself clued in.

Botany On The Wing

IMG_5962Back in school we all learned about how plants are pollinated and how the bees became part of, well, “the birds and the bees.”  So it was with some delight that I walked out my front door last night, heard some thrumming in the air, and turned to see his industrious bee tumbling and bumbling in the flowering bushes of our front beds. With his keister coated in pollen, he was a living testament to the wonders of botany.

Final Thoughts On Same-Sex Marriage, And America

The Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling has America talking.  It’s one of those events that can’t help but cause people of all persuasions and perspectives to stop and reflect — not so much on the relative merit of the Supreme Court’s opinion as a matter of constitutional jurisprudence, but rather on the fascinating, shifting, never-set-in-stone course of public opinion in our country.

In many recent conversations with friends, people have shaken their heads in wonderment at the speed with which people in the country have accepted the concept of same-sex relationships and, ultimately, same-sex marriage.  It’s hard to think of any other issue, during my lifetime, where prevailing public opinion seems to have shifted more rapidly.  Millennials have had a lot to do with this change.  At a recent dinner party, one of our friends was relating a conversation she had with her Millennial son about sexual orientation, and he said:  “Mom, to us it’s like being left-handed.”  I thought that was a really interesting — and encouraging — perspective.

On another level, the issue of same-sex marriage shows that, in America, if you wait long enough and pay attention, you’ll notice that things often come full circle.

Those of us who lived through the ’60s and ’70s remember that the avant garde, liberal position in those days was that marriage was passe.  Some people advocated free love and “open relationships” and argued that true commitment couldn’t really be based on a mere piece of paper, others derided marriage as a quaint throwback to the outdated notions of prior generations that could only stifle personal expression, still others pointed to the increasing divorce statistics and argued that the realities of the modern world meant that old-fashioned marriage simply could not work in the fast-paced modern world.  Of course, those arguments didn’t stop most of us from getting married, anyway.

During the ’60s and ’70s who would have predicted that, decades later, the issue of the right to engage in a legal marriage, in all of its get a license from a public agency, say your vows in front of the world, traditional glory, would be at the very forefront of the social change agenda?