A Well-Made Cocktail (IV)

IMG_6199Kish and I continued our occasional sampling of new cocktails Friday night during a visit to Curio.  This particular concoction is called a Salt and Pine.  I ordered it because the name made was so intriguing, and made it sound like the drink must taste the sweaty floor on a basketball court (not that I know what that would taste like, of course.)

Believe it or not, this cocktail was really very good.  Made with orange blossom water, vermouth, gin, lemon juice, lime juice, and salted honey syrup, finished with a lemon peel, and served in an icy, chilled glass, it had a light taste that was not too sweet.  Very refreshing, indeed!

I’m not really a spirits drinker, but I’ve been enjoying our periodic forays into the world of artisanal cocktails.  It’s fun to try something new.

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Third Sunday At Frank Fetch

IMG_6234Last night, between thunderstorms, Kish and Kasey and I walked over to Frank Fetch Park.  The third Sunday of every month the German Village Garten Club puts on a free concert at the little park that is located in the heart of German Village, and we wanted to check out the festivities.

IMG_6228We found that the 3rd Sunday Concerts are a great, very relaxed atmosphere.  People bring lawn chairs and dogs and food and drinks and — in one case, at least — a parrot that appeared to be molting, and the park is a beautiful, intimate setting.  The music was pretty darned good, too.  Last night it was the Shaun Booker Band, which had a great vocalist, guitarist, and saxophonist and played some funky jazz, including a pretty soulful version of The Beatles’ Come Together.

The 3rd Sunday Concerts are a nice way to get the last little bit of fun out of the weekend before the work day begins.  Kasey liked it, too.  For that matter, so did the parrot.

When Donald Gets Gonged

Donald Trump is an embarrassment. He’s been serving a purpose, in a perverse way, but now it’s time for him to exit stage left and serve a purpose in a different way.

Trump’s recent comments about John McCain are inexcusable. Obviously, it’s perfectly acceptable for anyone to disagree with Senator McCain about immigration. It’s not an easy issue, and it covers a lot of different big picture items, from employment to trade to national security against potential terrorist incursions. In America, there is room for many different positions along the political spectrum about immigration.

It isn’t appropriate, however, to question McCain’s patriotism, or his service, or to casually dismiss the meaning and impact of McCain’s POW experience. It not only is unfair to the man who was tortured and forced to live as a captive in a North Vietnam prison, it also shows an appalling lack of respect for all of those who have served in our armed forces and put their lives and personal security on the line. The reality of war is that some members of the military may get captured by the enemy, through no fault of their own. When that happens, those members of the military deserve our support, and when they bear up through their POW experience with the courage and dignity and fortitude shown by John McCain, they deserve to be called heroes. This is not a hard question — but apparently it is beyond Donald Trump.

Trump’s entry into the presidential race has been serving a purpose, in a perverse way — he’s been demonstrating by omission the qualities we should be looking for in a President. Do we want someone who responds to every criticism by lashing out with anger and insult humor, or do we want someone who is thick-skinned and capable of responding with grace and intelligence? Do we want a boastful schoolyard bully who never tires of touting his own wealth and accomplishments, or do we want a mature adult who has the skills to build a consensus around a reasoned position? Do we want someone so self-absorbed that he’ll say whatever is necessary to grab another headline, or do we want someone with the self-assurance to work behind the scenes in order to get the job done? In many ways, Donald Trump exemplifies all of the qualities of the anti-President; standing next to him, virtually any candidate would look like a thoughtful statesman.

As a society, we tend to tolerate people like Trump. He’s like a contestant on The Gong Show whose act is so bizarre that it briefly entertains through shock value — but quickly becomes tiresome and uncomfortable. With his comments on John McCain, Trump has crossed into gong territory. I’m glad to see that there seems to be a growing, uniform sentiment that Trump’s comments about Senator McCain are inexcusable. Trump may be serving a purpose in another way: by showing that, in our divided country, it is still possible to develop a true consensus about something.