Philadelphia Airport, Concourse C, 6:17 a.m.

When you’re spending another early morning bathed in the fluorescent glow of arrival and departure screens at another airport, you look for beauty wherever you can find it.  Say — that shade of blue is kind of peaceful, isn’t it?

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The Preferred “Best Doctor” Look

Careful study of airline in-flight magazines during my frequent recent travels has led me to conclude that there is a preferred “best doctor” look.

It wasn’t a hard conclusion to reach.  I mean, look at these guys, right next to each other in the same American Airlines mag — each with a well-tailored dark suit, nice tie, one hand in a pocket, and the other holding glasses.  You apparently can hold the glasses in the right or left hand, so long as they are present to convey that thoughtful doctor look.  

There are other, apparently less popular “best doctor” looks.  Sometimes you see the surgeons in scrubs, to convey that just out of the OR/working man feel.  And my favorite ones are the docs wearing lab coats and holding a model of a spine, or a skull, or some other device or implement to convey their area of specialization.  Those guys really look like doctors to me.

How do they pick these “best doctors” who appear in the same magazines that tout “best steakhouses” and “three perfect days in Knoxville”?  Who knows — maybe how they dress has something to do with it.

The Preferred “Best Doctor” Look

Careful study of airline in-flight magazines during my frequent recent travels has led me to conclude that there is a preferred “best doctor” look.

It wasn’t a hard conclusion to reach.  I mean, look at these guys, right next to each other in the same American Airlines mag — each with a well-tailored dark suit, nice tie, one hand in a pocket, and the other holding glasses.  You apparently can hold the glasses in the right or left hand, so long as they are present to convey that thoughtful doctor look.  

There are other, apparently less popular “best doctor” looks.  Sometimes you see the surgeons in scrubs, to convey that just out of the OR/working man feel.  And my favorite ones are the docs wearing lab coats and holding a model of a spine, or a skull, or some other device or implement to convey their area of specialization.  Those guys really look like doctors to me.

How do they pick these “best doctors” who appear in the same magazines that tout “best steakhouses” and “three perfect days in Knoxville”?  Who knows — maybe how they dress has something to do with it.

The Preferred “Best Doctor” Look

Careful study of airline in-flight magazines during my frequent recent travels has led me to conclude that there is a preferred “best doctor” look.

It wasn’t a hard conclusion to reach.  I mean, look at these guys, right next to each other in the same American Airlines mag — each with a well-tailored dark suit, nice tie, one hand in a pocket, and the other holding glasses.  You apparently can hold the glasses in the right or left hand, so long as they are present to convey that thoughtful doctor look.  

There are other, apparently less popular “best doctor” looks.  Sometimes you see the surgeons in scrubs, to convey that just out of the OR/working man feel.  And my favorite ones are the docs wearing lab coats and holding a model of a spine, or a skull, or some other device or implement to convey their area of specialization.  Those guys really look like doctors to me.

How do they pick these “best doctors” who appear in the same magazines that tout “best steakhouses” and “three perfect days in Knoxville”?  Who knows — maybe how they dress has something to do with it.

The Preferred “Best Doctor” Look

Careful study of airline in-flight magazines during my frequent recent travels has led me to conclude that there is a preferred “best doctor” look.

It wasn’t a hard conclusion to reach.  I mean, look at these guys, right next to each other in the same American Airlines mag — each with a well-tailored dark suit, nice tie, one hand in a pocket, and the other holding glasses.  You apparently can hold the glasses in the right or left hand, so long as they are present to convey that thoughtful doctor look.  

There are other, apparently less popular “best doctor” looks.  Sometimes you see the surgeons in scrubs, to convey that just out of the OR/working man feel.  And my favorite ones are the docs wearing lab coats and holding a model of a spine, or a skull, or some other device or implement to convey their area of specialization.  Those guys really look like doctors to me.

How do they pick these “best doctors” who appear in the same magazines that tout “best steakhouses” and “three perfect days in Knoxville”?  Who knows — maybe how they dress has something to do with it.