A Day Of Expectancy

The polling place in my neighborhood opens at 6:30 Eastern time this morning.  I’ll be there then, ready to exercise my franchise in this election — the latest election to be called The Most Important Election in American History.

vote_here_signs_0By voting on Election Day, I’m late to the game these days.  Many of my friends, colleagues and family members have already voted.  Richard has cast his ballot down in Texas, where early voting numbers have set records, and that’s true in other parts of the country, too.  I think early voting is a great thing, because it provides flexibility and allows more people to participate in the process in accordance with their work and family schedules.  Still, I prefer voting on Election Day itself.  The lines might be a little longer, but there is just something about being at the polls with your fellow citizens, waiting patiently and quietly to have your turn in the voting booth, without accompanying rancor or bluster.  There’s a certain solemnity to it, and a certain majesty, too.  It always makes me feel good about myself, my community, and my country.

I also like Election Day because it is a day of expectancy.  As the day unfolds, you know that millions of little, individual decisions are happening all around you that are slowly producing big, important results.  It’s like a titanic machine with countless small parts, moving ponderously but inexorably in one direction or another — and we’re the little gears and sprockets and cogs that make it go.  Whether we agree with the decisions or not, by the end of the day today we’ll have a pretty good idea of what our fellow citizens are thinking about the country and its direction.

And, especially recently, I like Election Day for yet another reason:  because after today, all of the commercials and predictions and fanfare will be over, at least for a little while, and we can have some breathing space before we start gearing up for the next Most Important Election in American History.  I think we can use some breathing space.

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Old Year Out, New Year In

Well, 2017 is gone, and 2018 is here. It’s the time of year when you’re supposed to reflect on the year gone by and look ahead to the new year aborning.

As for 2017 — well, it was good and bad. We had a wonderful wedding that added a new Webner to the fold, and the year saw some successes and significant developments for the Webner clan. At the same time, 2017 was a year where we lost some close friends. And, if you broaden your horizon to include national and international developments, the story of 2017 becomes even more muddled. Years can be like that.

As for 2018, my hopes are simple — I just want our little circle to enjoy robust good health, know true happiness from time to time, feel a sense of significant personal accomplishment every once in a while, and revel in hearty laughter as much as possible. I’m personally going to try to maintain more of a sense of wonder about the world, and keep in mind the question I’d be asking if someone had transported me from 1969 to 2018:

Hey, where are the flying cars?