Death Bands

The recent passing of Ginger Baker, the brilliant drummer for Cream and Blind Faith, made me think that, if there’s a rock ‘n roll afterlife, somebody’s band just had a great addition to its rhythm section.  And that thought, in turn, made me think:  okay, this is morbid and probably insensitive to boot, but if you were to assemble a dream band out of dead rockers, who would be the members?

depositphotos_5334627-stock-photo-rock-n-roll-is-deadThis isn’t a novel concept.  Back in the ’70s the Righteous Brothers recorded a song about dead musicians called Rock and Roll Heaven that had artists like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Bobby Darin, and Jim Croce putting on a big show in the Great Beyond.  (And now that I’ve mentioned the song, those of us old enough to remember it will have a hard time getting it out of our heads.)  But there’s a big difference between putting on a single show featuring disparate artists and assembling a functioning band.  You’ve got to factor in styles, for example.  How would Jim Morrison mesh with, say, Kurt Cobain?

I think I’d go with John Lennon, George Harrison, and Chuck Berry on guitars, with Ginger Baker on drums and John Entwistle of the Who on bass, for a band that could really play some classic, old school early rock ‘n roll.  But you also have to wonder about what kind of interesting music could be produced if you put together combinations like Hendrix, Morrison, and Keith Moon of the Who, or Elvis Presley, Cobain, Glenn Frey, John Bonham, and Clarence Clemons, or Prince, Leon Russell, and David Bowie.  With more and more old rockers passing on with each new year, unfortunately, there’s a lot of choices.

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The Air Guitar Time Machine

I probably first played air guitar when I was 13 or 14, after we moved from Akron to Columbus.  We were living in a bigger house and I had gotten my own room, which I equipped with a radio and with the family’s hand-me-down record player, a cheap and unsteady Panasonic unit with plastic speakers.  In that little enclave of my own, I really started to discover rock music beyond The Beatles and The Monkees.

Like many teenaged boys, I was drawn to the guitar gods of the day — Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Keith Richards, Ritchie Blackmore of Deep Purple, and others, the slouching, long-haired titans who delivered the intricate, crushing solos that kicked your spirits into another gear and managed to look uber-cool while doing so.  I saw clips of their performances on the late-night music shows and how they looked while playing.

So, was it really so surprising that, when you put a song like Led Zeppelin’s Stairway to Heaven or Cream’s Crossroads or the Rolling Stones’ Monkey Man on that flimsy Panasonic turntable and felt the surge of energy that those songs inevitably produced, a little air guitar solo would surface?  When you were in the grip of those songs, you had to do something to participate, and the choices boiled down to playing air drums with the John Bonhams and Ginger Bakers and Keith Moons of the world — or playing air guitar.  I chose air guitar, even though I had no idea what I was doing and whether my chord-fingering on the air fretboard and picking and strumming on the air strings bore any relation to guitar-playing reality, and even though I knew I looked silly doing it.  It just felt like the right thing to do, and it was fun, besides.

It still does, and still is.  Even now, more than 40 years later, if you put me alone in a room and start playing Derek and the Dominos’ Key To The Highway or Deep Purple’s Smoke On The Water or Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Call Me The Breeze, the impulse to play a little air guitar (and in the latter case, a little air keyboards, too) and feel like a kid again while doing so will be irresistible.  Those songs are like a kind of time machine that transports me back to that poster-filled room with the scratchy Panasonic unit playing at the loudest decibel level I dared, and my guess is that the same is true for many of us fifty-something guys.

It’s nice to know that, lurking under the extra pounds and the grey hair and the aching back, there’s a little bit of that teenager energy and silliness still to be found.