Letting Your Resiliency Roar

If I’ve learned one thing in life, it’s that most people are pretty resilient and adaptable.  Bad things happen to us all, for sure, but generally people cheerfully bounce back — and, more importantly, they consciously find a way to bounce back.

1940s-two-women-office-workers-standing-by-office-water-news-photo-1580932806I thought about this yesterday when the B.A. Jersey Girl started a text message chain for those of us who are working together on a particular matter.  With the B.A.J.G. kicking things off, we all shared pictures of our home office set-ups to be used during this work from home period.  There was a wide variance in the home office work spaces shown in the photos, with some people rigging up impressively elaborate arrangements with multiple monitors and printers.  (My kitchen counter arrangement is decidedly at the spartan end of the spectrum, I might add.)  And we got a peek at some dogs and cats that were intrigued that their human friends were home at times that they usually weren’t, and apparently decided to just check things out.  It was funny and fun at the same time.

There’s a social element to work, whether it’s somebody ducking their head into your office to chat about the latest news or family developments, casual greetings in hallways. or friendly banter in the elevator or around the coffee station.  When you work from home, obviously, you’re not getting those in-person encounters — but people are resilient and will find a way to make up for that.  And with technology offering various alternatives, there are work arounds for just about everything.

My guess is that cell phone providers are seeing a real surge in text messaging, face timing, and phone calling to establish that element of human interaction during this period of social distancing.  For office colleagues, it’s a way to make up for lost time around the proverbial water cooler.

Looking In The Mirror, And Hearing Your Own Voice

I have a weakness for learning about human psychology.  How do humans think?  What approaches are more and less likely to cause the listener (or reader, for that matter) to have the intended reaction?  I think it is fascinating stuff.

One reason the results of psychological studies and experiments are so interesting is that it’s easy to translate the information to your own experience.  It’s like looking in a mirror.  It’s impossible not to consider how you match up with the results.  It’s nice when they indicate that your modus operandi is sound — but it’s hard to take when the data reveals that your approach is hopelessly wrong.

We all look in the mirror countless times a day, but often we don’t really recognize how we are perceived by others.  It’s like the shock you felt when you first heard your own recorded voice and realized it didn’t sound to others like it sounds in your own head.

How do you react when you see someone unintentionally do something that is completely off-putting, counterproductive, or inflammatory?  I always wonder how the person could be so clueless — and I find it unnerving because I realize that I also could be blundering through life, deeply offending people I’m actually trying to impress or persuade.

We’d all be better off if we spent more time studying the human condition.