Original Fixture

Our little cottage in Stonington has been revised and reconfigured and redesigned repeatedly since it was first built in the early 1900s.  As a result of all of the renovation work, we think there’s only one original fixture still in the house — the ceiling light in the guest room.  We’re determined to keep it as the one interior connection to the original design of the place.

It wasn’t a hard decision, because it’s a nifty little pink glass piece that has a distinctly old-fashioned, cottagey vibe to it.  But what I particularly like is the design.  Unlike modern overhead lights, which require you to stand, aching arms stretched directly overhead, and loosen multiple screws and then remove a glass fitting to get to the light bulb, this design is open.  Remove one of the anchors, tilt the pink glass section down, and voila!  You can easily change the light bulb or, more frequently, remove the inevitable collection of fly carcasses that you’re always going to find in a summer cottage.

It’s as if the light fixture design was based on the practical realities of where the light fixture would be and how it would be used, and took into consideration making it easier and simpler for the user to do the basics like changing a bulb.  What a concept!

New Digs

We’re now officially landowners again.  On Friday afternoon we closed on our new house located smack dab in the middle of German Village, located near Lindey’s, G. Michael’s Bistro, and the Book Loft.

IMG_4641It’s an older brick home built, we think, in 1906, and there’s a fair amount of work to be done before we move in.  Kish is acting as a kind of general contractor, coordinating the appearance, estimates, and work of painters, hardwood flooring firms, electricians, landscapers, and cabinet companies who will be getting the house up to Code — in this case, Kish Code. Already, work has begun.  We met with the painter yesterday morning, and he and his assistant spent the day patching holes and putting on the priming coats.

In the meantime, Kish has been fielding helpful advice from a decorator and friends who have that feng shui flair, particularly on the big sticking point — light fixtures.  What should we hang in the foyer, and what in the dining room?  Should they match in some way?  How do we thread the needle of three desires:  wanting fixtures that are physically attractive, put out sufficient light to serve their real purpose, and are easy to clean and don’t require impossible physical manipulations when it’s time to change a bulb?  We’ve looked at so many light fixtures that all of the pop-up ads on any website we access immediately cycle to lighting products and special deals on chandeliers.

It’s an exciting time for us.