Columbus Microbrew Festival

This afternoon I stopped by the North Market to pick up some wine and cheese to consume tonight — it is a holiday weekend, after all — and I picked up a flier for the Columbus Microbrew Festival.

It’s the 8th annual Festival.  The 8th!  I’ve been blissfully unaware that the Festival even existed, so I’ve missed the first seven.  The very thought gives me an empty, gnawing feeling.

As any reader of our little blog knows, I am a big supporter of local businesses and downtown activities. I also love beer, so the Festival is right up my alley.  My question to our readers — and I’m thinking here of the Biking Brewer — is:  what is appropriate behavior at a Microbrew Festival?  Are attendees supposed to sip the brews and comment daintily on the “nose” and whether the taste has hints of raspberry and anise, or is it acceptable to guzzle every adult malt beverage within reach and thank the ancient gods that they taught the fine art of brewing to our ancestors?

I’m also very intrigued by the names of some of the microbrewers who will be participating in the Festival.  Who wouldn’t want to sample a porter brewed by Weasel Boy Brewing Company, or Thirsty Dog Brewing Company, or Seventh Son Brewing Company?  What central Ohioan wouldn’t feel compelled to sample the product of Mt. Carmel Brewing Company, or Buckeye Lake Brewery?

If you’re intrigued, too, mark your calendars — the Festival is September 13, 14, and 15 at the North Market.

Straub – Highly Recommended

Before the late, much-lamented Corner’s Beverage Shoppe closed its doors, and Richard went off on his European adventure, on Fridays he and I used to pick out a six-pack or two of new beers to sample over the weekend.  One day we picked out a six-pack of Straub, and I’ve been a fan ever since.  (Since Corner’s has gone away, I’ve been glad to learn that Straub also is carried by the New Albany Giant Eagle in its enormous “beer cave.”)

The label on the bottle advertises Straub as “honestly fresh,” and I think that is a very fair description.  The brew is a light, quite tasty lager with good body, a clean, smooth taste, and no aftertaste.

Although I’ve only discovered it recently, Straub beer has been around since 1872.  It is brewed in Pennsylvania — hey, I thought only Rolling Rock and Iron City came from the Quaker State! — and is a good example of the quality microbrewery offerings that can be found throughout America.  And, in these days of high gas prices and penny-pinching economic uncertainty, when six-packs of some microbrew offerings are priced at $10 and above, Straub’s reasonable price is as refreshing as its beer.  I’m glad Richard and I decided to try it during one of our weekend beer samplings.