Children’s Books And Lasting Lessons

At the southeast corner of Schiller Park, a pedestrian can take two routes. One can use the access driveways in and out of the parking lot to cut the corner and save a few steps. Or, one can go through the driveways to the actual corner beyond before turning the corner and continuing the walk. I always walk through to the corner beyond the driveway before turning, and when I do I think “neat and square.”

“Neat and square” is a line from Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, a book I read as a kid. It’s just one of the things that has stuck with me from that book Mom first read to me so long ago.

You may know the story. Mike Mulligan has a steam shovel named Mary Anne. Mike was proud of her and the work they could do together, and boasted of Mary Anne’s capabilities. And Mike and Mary Anne did the job right, always finishing the corners of what they dug “neat and square.” But it was hard for an old-fashioned steam shovel to compete with newfangled diesel-powered digging machines. In one troubling scene in the book, Mike and Mary Anne view a junk heap of other sad, discarded steam shovels that have been abandoned by their owners. But Mike is loyal to Mary Anne and would never dream of doing that.

Mike goes out to a small town that is digging a cellar for a new town hall and gets the job on the condition that he and Mary Anne can dig the basement in just one day. When the day comes, Mike and Mary Anne continue to do the job right, and finish the corners neat and square, even though the clock is against them. A crowd gathers, which causes Mike and Mary Anne to work faster than ever before—and just as the sun is setting they finish the job. But there’s a problem: in their frenzied rush to complete the digging in just one day, Mike and Mary Anne have forgotten to leave a ramp for Mary Anne to exit the cellar, and she is trapped. Fortunately, a boy in the crowd suggests that Mary Anne use her steam to become the new furnace, the town builds the town hall around her, and the story happily ends with Mary Anne heating the hall and Mike serving as its janitor.

It’s a good book, with some powerful messages that resonated with me. Do the job right, and be proud of your work. Be loyal to those you work with. And recognize that sometimes difficult problems can be solved with creative thinking.

Those lessons have stuck with me for decades. It just shows that reading to your children can really have a lifelong impact.

The Great Columbus Sub-Zero Water Main Break Of 2014 — An Update

I drove to work this morning fully expecting to find closed roads and skating rink conditions still in downtown Columbus due to yesterday’s water main break. To my astonishment, however, the roads were open and the water main break had been fixed.

IMG_1672How did this come about? A Herculean work effort under ridiculously bad conditions by the City of Columbus Water Department workers, who somehow plugged the breach overnight. They were still out this morning, using a backhoe to break up the asphalt on Fourth Street. By this afternoon they had dug a deep, square hole so that they could get at the root cause of the break. Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel couldn’t have done better — and the Water Department workers were doing the job on a day when the temperature didn’t get above the single digits and the wind chill was below zero.

Working in water-logged conditions on such a frigid day must have been terrible. On behalf of all downtown workers who avoided a frustrating traffic snarl due to road closures, I want to say “thanks” to the hard-working folks at the Water Department who pulled off a seeming miracle.

Oh, and there was one other component to the miracle: salt. Lots and lots of salt, and de-icing granules, and every other ice-melting substance known to modern man. I’m not sure how much salt was dumped on the roads and alleys and sidewalks near the intersection of Fourth and Gay Street in the last 36 hours — a ton? two tons? — but there was a coating of salt still visible today, and the salt runoff had leached all color out of the roads and sidewalks. Since I would prefer salt-colored by dry conditions to risking a bad fall on icy sidewalks, that was just fine with me.