Webner House On The Web — Literally

Selling a house sure has changed a lot since the last time we did it!

20141107145227103797000000This shouldn’t be a surprise.  As you would expect, technology and social media have been brought strongly into the mix.  Yesterday a professional photographer come out to take pictures of our happy homestead, and now they’re on the web.  You can find the link to the photos, taken on a rainy afternoon, here.  Our realtor also instantly prepared glossy brochures with the photos and a description of our house and neighborhood that are resting on our kitchen island, ready to be reviewed by potential buyers, and there is a basket next to the front door with plastic shoe coverings and a little sign asking that visitors use the booties to avoid tracking outdoor debris into the pristine Webner House premises.

Speaking of visitors, there’s no need to worry about that potentially awkward seller-buyer encounter.  In fact, there’s an app for that.  I downloaded it today, and it is supposed to keep track of when people are going to be visiting.  Our realtor also calls, emails, and texts, too, to make sure that everyone is on the same page when it comes to a showing.  The only thing I’m lacking is an ankle bracelet to give me a reminder electric shock when it’s time to hit the road and let the visiting couple roam freely through the house.

Condo For Sale

Mom and Dad bought their condo in suburban Columbus more than 20 years ago.  They enjoyed the place, and after Dad’s death Mom has lived there very happily.  Now, however, she has decided that the condo is more house than she really needs or wants, so it is being put up for sale.

IMG_1197The process of getting the condo ready to sell has been a chance for our family to work together on a single project for the first time in a long time.  Children and grandchildren alike have spent hours cleaning and scrubbing, sweeping and vacuuming, boxing things up and moving things out.  It’s been a good chance for us all to reconnect, and with five kids and spouses and grandkids pitching in to share the workload, it made the cleanup and clean out process manageable . . . and fun, too.  The experience also has been another illustration of how much stuff Americans tend to accumulate — and for what purpose?  Our work at Mom’s condo has caused Kish and me to recommit ourselves to thinning out our collection of boxes and those random, long-unused items stored in closets, the basement, and the garage.

We’ve hired a realtor, and he has guided us through the process of getting the place ready to be shown.  We’ve weighed his comparables information, set a price, and tried to avoid too much second-guessing about it, and this past weekend the condo went on the market.  I stopped over on Saturday to make sure the realtor had everything he needs, and I bumped into some empty nesters being shown through the condo by a different realtor.  They said the condo was lovely, which I appreciated, and I was happy that there was traffic — but seeing them there gave me an odd feeling.  I’m not sure I’ll stop by again.