At The Heart Of Town

I worked for a while today at the Stonington Public Library. It’s a nifty little facility with free wireless, a good reading table, and a really excellent book selection for its size. And, like most small town libraries, it’s at the center of it all. While I was there, numerous people stopped by to pick up a book, chat up the friendly librarian, and talk about what’s going on.

Libraries are one of those civic institutions that hold towns together. Stonington has a really good one.

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The Mini-Village Of Stonington

Small towns always seem to be filled with interesting characters and interesting stories. Stonington is no different.

One such story lies behind the “mini-village” of tiny houses and buildings found at one end of town. You can get a sense of their scale from the picture with Betty, below.

The buildings are the handiwork of Everette Knowlton, who began building them in 1947 and placed them on his property. By the time he died in 1978, he had constructed an entire village, complete with church, school, grocery store, barns, gas station, and homes. The purchaser of his property after his death donated the village to the town, and every year townspeople store the buildings for the winter and return them in the spring for everyone to enjoy.

I think the last part, about the citizens of Stonington storing the buildings for decades, is the coolest part of the story. It tells you something about the community.

Out Of The Furnace

It’s cold and bleak today, so Kish and I decided to go see a movie.  A bleak day seemed to demand a bleak movie, so we went to see Out of the Furnace — which is bleak, indeed.

Out of the Furnace is purportedly the story of two brothers, one of whom avenges the other, but in reality it’s a grim tale of small town and rural America.  The brothers, played by Christian Bale and Casey Affleck, live in a mill town.  One of the brothers has a job at the mill, the other has served multiple tours in the military only to return to find . . . nothingness.  No opportunity, no hope, and no way to shake the demons created by his experience overseas.  He turns to bare-fisted fighting, and the fight scenes are brutal.

Without spoiling the plot, the brothers run afoul of Harlan DeGroat, a twisted sadist played with blazing intensity by Woody Harrelson.  You realize that DeGroat is as much a victim of the dead-end world in which he lives as are the two brothers — he’s just turned to drug manufacturing, drug pushing, gambling, and other forms of criminal activity because that’s a way to use his talents.  Harrelson is astonishingly believable in the role, and his portrayal of DeGroat is harrowing and will probably inspire a nightmare or two.  This is not a guy you’d want to encounter even in broad daylight with a policeman nearby.

Out of the Furnace is a riveting ride, but it isn’t a movie for the faint of heart, and not just because the story is a sad one.  We left the theater wondering if the tattooed, beer-swilling, snaggletoothed hopelessness depicted in the movie really reflects what is going on in for young people in small town and rural America — and hoping that it wasn’t.