Sledding Debris

IMG_2814One of the prime sledding hills in New Albany near Club Drive, next to the tee of number one North, has been getting a workout.  There’s lots of snow on the ground, and it’s been packed down to a hard consistency.  The hill isn’t too high, but just high enough to achieve significant, uncontrolled velocity as the sledder pushes off at the peak and then goes rocketing down the slope and ultimately knocks into the fence so far below.

Of course, the combination of the occasional collision with the body heat generated by overbundled kids constantly trudging up the slippery slope means we’ll see sledding debris — and we do.  Bits of cheap plastic sled that have cracked in the cold and broken off, a scarf removed, placed on a fence, and then promptly forgotten, and especially wool hats that little boys take off when they get overheated and leave on the hill with a shrug.

When the owner of this kid’s stocking cap went home, his aggravated Mom undoubtedly noticed his hat was missing, and wondered:  How in the heck can you forget about your winter hat when it’s 25 degrees out?  Those of us who once were little boys on a sledding hill remember, and know well the answer to that question.