What Kids Want To Know

What do kids really want to know?  Sometimes parents wonder.

Fortunately, there’s the “What If” website and book to help answer that eternal question.  It promises to provide serious scientific answers to absurd hypothetical questions.

backyard-designs-outdoor-swimming-pools-5And guess what?  It turns out that kids want to know answers to questions that I’d also like to have answered, like:  “How long would it take for a single person to fill up an entire swimming pool with their own saliva?”

This is a question that is of intense and particular interest to me, ever since a kind of disgusted dentist who was constantly having to use the spit-sucking device and multiple cotton swabs told me, when I was but a callow youth, that I had “exceptional saliva flow.”  Now I’m proud of my drool-producing capacity.

It turns out that it would take a normal person a very long time to fill that pool.  Humans produce an average of half a liter of saliva a day, which would mean it would take a year to fill a bathtub.  And, at that rate, it would take 8,345 years to fill an Olympic-sized pool to a depth of four feet.  Even at my alarming spit-producing rate — I’m guessing I’m at least double the average in the drool category — I wouldn’t be able to accomplish even a reasonably sized in-ground backyard pool in my lifetime.

Too bad!  It would be a laudable life goal.

A Noble Place To Stay

IMG_4092During our visit to San Antonio we are staying on the second floor of the Aaron Pancoast Carriage House, in a bed and breakfast arrangement.  On trips like this we look for an alternative to hotels if possible, and Kish did a great job in finding this place.

I’m a fan of old hotels, but when you’re staying somewhere for more than two days they can begin to feel cramped and sterile.  Under those circumstances, the bed and breakfast can offer some real advantages.  You’re in a real neighborhood, rather than a downtown hotel district, and often that allows you to get a more rounded perspective on the town you’re visiting.  It’s also nice to camp out in a place that has a refrigerator, a large common area where we can spread out and read, and other agreeable amenities.

IMG_4051Our lodging here is one of three locations owned by Noble Inns.  All of them are located in the beautiful King William Historic District area of San Antonio (more about that later).  The district is on the RiverWalk, which means we’re just a short stroll away from downtown.  It’s nice to be able to walk rather than driving, and we’ve taken advantage of that convenience.

We eat our breakfast in the lushly decorated Oge House.  It’s got a historic landmark sign outside, and inside it has all of the fantastic carvings and moldings and nooks and crannies that make me marvel at how unique these old homes were, and how soulless and cookie-cutter our modern homes have become.  It’s a pleasure walking in the front door and eating a home-cooked meal in the dining room.

We stay in the carriage house found right across the street.  It’s a pleasant place with one huge advantage:  a fantastic pool complete with statuary that makes you feel like you’re hanging out at a Roman villa.  I am not much of a pool person, but when you’ve been walking along in 90-plus degree heat and bright sunshine it’s nice to take a dip in cool water and then find a shady spot for some reading and conversation.  The Romans knew what they were doing.IMG_4093