Happy Veterans’ Day! (II)

-1In furtherance of Veterans’ Day, I share this picture that Kish found of her Dad, Bill Kishman, in his Army uniform during  World War II.  He was one of the finest people I’ve ever met, and he was proud of his service for his country.

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Tanks To All Of Our Veterans

IMG_7450Today was the Columbus Veterans’ Day parade, which means high school bands, flatbed truck floats, and marching veterans.  And, of course a rare tank on the streets of downtown Columbus — which occasioned the bad pun in the headline of this post.

Most sincere thanks to all of our veterans for their service!

888,246 Poppies

It’s an idea that is cool yet devastating — plant one handcrafted, red, ceramic poppy for each live lost by a British or Colonial soldier during  World War I, the War to End All Wars that gave rise to America’s Veterans Day and Remembrance Day in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries.  It’s simple, and yet as the poppies flood out of the Tower of London and cover the green grass of its moat it gives you a shock at the enormity of the losses that were sustained, without even counting the soldiers who returned from the terrible conflict shell-shocked, with lungs burned by poison gas, or missing arms and legs.

The piece is called Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, and it shows how powerful public art can be.  It also reminds us of the sacrifices that our veterans have made, and the ultimate sacrifice of those who served willingly and did not return home.

On this Veterans’ Day, thanks to all of our veterans!

Remembering Congressional Medal of Honor Winners On Veterans Day

Today is Veterans Day, when every American should be grateful for the sacrifices of all of those who have served in the military.  What better way to appreciate the true meaning of their service than to recall those whose service was so extraordinary — so conspicuous for its courage, gallantry, and selflessness — that they received the Congressional Medal of Honor, our nation’s highest military award?

The Congressional Medal of Honor was established in 1862, during the early days of the Civil War.  Its first recipient was Private Jacob Parrott, who penetrated deep into Confederate territory to destroy railroad tracks and seize a train.  The Civil War also saw the first award of the Medal of Honor to an African-American — Sergeant William Carney of the famed 54th Massachusetts Infantry, who participated in the assault on Fort Wagner, planted the flag on the parapet, and kept the flag from touching the ground despite twice being severely wounded.

The only award of the Medal of Honor to a woman, Dr. Mary Walker, also occurred during the Civil War.  Dr. Walker received the Medal for her service throughout the Civil War, which included caring for the wounded at the battles of Bull Run, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Atlanta, and then spending four months as a prisoner of war after being captured.

In the 150 years since its establishment, the Congressional Medal of Honor has been awarded to 3,463 people, of whom 78 are still living.  The most recent recipient is Captain William D. Swenson, who received his Medal on October 15, 2013 for his actions in Afghanistan in 2009.  Captain Swenson led his men under fire during a six-hour firefight against enemy forces who surrounded them on three sides, refused to surrender, provided medical aid to a wounded fellow soldier, and then twice exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to rescue wounded soldiers and recover fallen soldiers.

The Congressional Medal of Honor is awarded to those who service has been extraordinary, but the qualities of courage, self-sacrifice, and service that it commemorates are shared by all of the men and women who serve honorably in our armed forces.  On this Veterans Day, a heartfelt thank you to all of our veterans and active duty personnel!

Thank You To Our Veterans

It’s November 11 — Veterans’ Day.

Thank you to all veterans for your commitment, for your dedication, and for your service.  You have manned the trenches, scrambled onto the bloody beaches, piloted the planes through anti-aircraft fire, driven the tanks, tended the grievously wounded, and done the other terrible but necessary things that have kept our country safe and free.  All Americans — and all peoples who have been freed from tyranny through your efforts — deeply appreciate the sacrifices our veterans have endured, and grieve at the losses that the families of all who have served in the military have suffered.

Freedom doesn’t come cheaply.  It is our soldiers and our veterans who have paid the steepest price for our liberty.  For that, we are forever grateful.

Winning, And Saluting Our Soldiers

Yesterday the Ohio State Buckeyes manhandled the Fighting Illini, 52-22, in a game that really wasn’t that close.  Ohio State ran the ball at will, completed long pass plays, and throttled the Illinois offense as they moved to 10-0.

It also was a good example of why attending a game is a different experience than watching it on TV.  Before the game, at halftime, and during all those timeouts when TV viewers are forced to watch commercials about cars and beer, Ohio Stadium was saluting our military.

When timeouts came, recorded greetings from Buckeyes serving abroad were played on the big scoreboard, and students in the ROTC were introduced down on the field.  Before the game military members unfurled a huge flag as The Best Damn Band In The Land played the National Anthem, and then two fighter jets screamed by overhead.  And at halftime, TBDBITL played a series of songs from military movies while the band members marched into patriotic shapes and Old Glory was displayed again, at the center of a star.

TBDBITL is always wonderful, and yesterday’s show and general salute to the members of our military, presented just a few days before Veterans’ Day, was well timed for another reason — at the end of a long and sometimes bitter presidential campaign, it was nice to see something that everyone in attendance, regardless of party affiliation, could cheer wholeheartedly.