My Letter To Congressman Tiberi About Net Neutrality

Today is Internet Slowdown Day.  It’s a form of protest intended to educate people to the concept of net neutrality — the notion that all websites should load with equal speed, and access providers shouldn’t be permitted to sell faster access to the those who can afford to pay top dollar for it and relegate the rest of us to the slow lane.  WordPress, the nifty website that hosts our little blog, is one of the companies that is participating in Internet Slowdown Day.

I think this is an important issue, and not just because I’m a blogger who can’t afford to pay for the internet fast lane and who hates the spinning circle of death, besides.  So, I did something that I’ve never done before:  I wrote an email to my congressman, Representative Pat Tiberi, using his website to do so.  Here’s what I wrote, after the initial introductory paragraph:

I found nothing on your website to address the issue of net neutrality. Therefore, I wanted to write to encourage you to support the concept of net neutrality and oppose any legislation or regulations that would allow internet providers to slow down certain websites or prefer certain internet addresses over others.

The internet is a great thing precisely because it allows ordinary people to voice their views and, in some small way, influence public debate and the direction of national policy. The internet therefore is a bastion of democracy and fairness in a world in which the media has become increasingly consolidated and corporatized.  I think bloggers (and, in the interests of full and fair disclosure, I should note that I am one of them) make an important contribution to American culture precisely because they are independent voices. Whatever we might think about the political or social views that bloggers express, we need more independent voices, not fewer.

The blogging culture in America has thrived because bloggers’ views can be delivered to readers, or to anyone who taps in the right Google search, on a level playing field with the titanic companies that otherwise dominate American media. If the principle of net neutrality is not preserved, that will no longer be true. People who might otherwise read a blog to access a different point of view will encounter the dreaded spinning circle that says that no connection yet exists, become frustrated, and move on to some larger website that can afford to pay for faster access without waiting to see what the humble bloggers have to say. In our impatient, hurry-up world, where we’ve come to expect and demand instantaneous internet access, such a result means that the independent voices will effectively be stilled, and the consolidation and corporatization of the media will become even more pronounced. Let’s not let that happen!

Congressman Tiberi, I know that there are many issues before Congress, but I think this is one of special importance where the decisions being made could have significant ramifications for the future of our country and our culture of free speech and open communications. I hope I can count on your support for net neutrality and your opposition to any initiative that would quash the voices of the little guys.

If you also think that the notion of net neutrality is an important one, please write your representative or Senators and let them know of your views.  Let’s try to keep the internet a public forum in which all can participate equally.

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2 thoughts on “My Letter To Congressman Tiberi About Net Neutrality

    • That was the FCC vote, Congress can still stop the repeal of Net Neutrality by overturning the repeal. Just needs a majority of votes and then net neutrality is safe.

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