Noon Kickoff Memories

Today the Ohio State Buckeyes play the Maryland Terrapins at noon.  Nowadays, that seems like a weird time for an OSU football game.  It’s so early!  Now, the Buckeyes typically play at 3:30 or at 8:00, under the lights.

But when I first started going to OSU football games in the ’70s, noon was the kickoff time for pretty much every game.  And at our house, where Dad and Mom hosted a gang of clients, colleagues, and family members who were going to the game, the noon kickoff produced a certain rhythm and sameness.

Scarlet-and-gray clad people started arriving at about 8:30.  An Ohio State Marching Band record would be playing on the stereo, and Mom would lay out a buffet of food.  For the hardy souls — and I do mean hardy — Uncle Tony would prepare lethal, translucent Bloody Marys that could end your football Saturday before it really began.  Jim, Aunt Bebe and I would look at Aunt Bebe’s football card, which identified the games you could bet on for the day and their spreads, and Aunt Bebe would consult her season-long Stat-Key information before making her picks. As kickoff time neared, we’d start to hear the motors of the prop planes flying overhead, heading for Ohio Stadium with their advertising banners for pizza or insurance in tow.

We’d nibble at food, listening to the noise level in our split-level house mount as more people arrived and feeling that growing excitement that comes with the knowledge that a game is only hours away and you’re going.  Jim and I were usually responsible for making sure that iced-down coolers of beer and sodas were put in our transportation.  Then the departure time would come, and we’d don our Buckeye Nation gear, pile into a van or RV, and roll from Upper Arlington down to the French Field House parking lot across from the Stadium for some tailgating before game time.

After the game — which usually lasted no more than three hours, because only one or two of Ohio State’s games were televised each season and at the game you didn’t have to wait through a bunch of commercial interruptions — we’d return home, ready to celebrate another Buckeye victory and eat the lavish spread that Mom had set out.  The adults would drink some more, but Jim and I would usually go outside to throw the football around with our neighborhood friends on a crisp autumn afternoon, and there was still plenty of daylight left to do so.  When we came back inside the remaining guests were roaring and red-faced and entertaining in their own right, and usually there would be a late game to watch before the 11:30 start of The Woody Hayes Show rolled around.

College football coaches don’t like noon kickoffs these days.  They want a later kickoff, so visiting recruits can see the campus and spend some time with the current players before the games begin, and I can understand that.  But as a kid, I liked the noon games.  The memories of those games during my teenage years are still very fresh.

Woody Week

Ohio State has viewed Michigan as its great opponent for more than a century, but the modern rivalry really took its shape when Wayne Woodrow Hayes became the head football coach at Ohio State in 1951.  It was Woody Hayes who schemed all year for the game against That Team Up North, Woody Hayes who purportedly pushed his car back to Ohio rather than buying a tank of gas in Michigan, Woody Hayes who attempted a two-point conversion rather than an extra point in a beat-down of the Wolverines and, when asked why he went for two, responded “Because I couldn’t go for three.”

That’s why, for members of Buckeye Nation who are my generation or older, Michigan Week really is Woody Week.  From the Ohio State side, Coach Hayes is the inescapable colossus who helped to define what the ultimate rivalry in sports was really all about.  You can’t help but think about him as The Game draws near.

But there is more to the story than that.  Woody Hayes was always a complex figure — professorial and intellectual, a student of military history who was likely to quote Emerson, yet possessed of a volcanic temper that propelled him into embarrassing sideline outbursts, including the furious punch that cost him his job.  A man who was the iconic face of Ohio State football but didn’t insist on large contracts and happily lived in the same tidy Upper Arlington house for years, who was gracious to the timid students who knocked on the door of his office and asked if the Coach might sign a football for their father or uncle, who mentored his players and hectored them into getting their degrees and pursuing post-football careers as doctors, politicians, and lawyers.  Living in Columbus, you inevitably encounter people who were touched by the generosity and decency of Woody Hayes, whether it involved an unpublicized hospital visit to a sick child or an encouraging word to a struggling young person.

Over the years, my perception of Coach Hayes changed, and I think I’m not alone in that.  For me he began as a too-conservative football coach whose temper-fueled antics often made Ohio State the butt of jokes, then became the modern Greek dramatic hero whose passion led inexorably to his downfall.  Now, as the stories of what he did are told and retold, he has become a venerated figure whose failings are forgiven, if not forgotten, because his strength of character and good deeds vastly outweighed them.

For those of us who have made mistakes in our lives — a population that includes me and most of the billions of people on planet Earth — the story of Woody Hayes is a warming and ultimately encouraging human story of the possibility of redemption and how good deeds can live on as blunders fade away.  It’s a good story to remember each year during Michigan Week.

Pinch Me, I’m Dreaming

What year is it, anyway?  Is it 1986?  1980?  1964?

I’m asking because I look at the ESPN website tonight, and the Cleveland Browns are in first place, alone, in their division — thanks to the Pittsburgh Steelers stumbling against the hapless New York Jets.  The last time the Browns were in first place happened, apparently, 19 years ago.  By my calculation, that’s 1995, when Bill Clinton was President, I was still in my 30s, and we’d just moved into a new subdivision in New Albany.  I’d like to take a screen shot of the ESPN standings as of today, just to have a record of it.

It reminds me of an old story about Lee Corso, back when he was coaching the Indiana Hoosiers.  In a game against Ohio State during the Woody era, Indiana somehow scored first and had a 7-0 lead.  When that happened, Corso had his picture taken in front of the scoreboard.  Of course, Indiana ended up getting pulverized — but Corso always kept that photo showing him with the lead against the Buckeyes.

I don’t know what’s going to happen with the Browns, but I do know this — they’re keeping the season interesting.  I just hope that it lasts for a few weeks longer.,

It’s Michigan Week! (IV)

We’re less than 24 hours away from The Game.  It will be a noon start tomorrow, which is the way it should be, because it’s the way it has always been.

The Game will be at the Big House in Ann Arbor.  Like the Horseshoe in Columbus, Michigan Stadium is one of college football’s most fabled venues, a huge, cavernous bowl dug out of the ground.  It’s where Woody Hayes and Bo Schembechler prowled the sidelines during the 10-Year War.  It’s where the Buckeyes tore down the “M Club” banner in the early ’70s, sending the Michigan radio announcer into a frenzy.  The field is thick with memories and legends.  Tomorrow the members of Buckeye Nation will try to fill a significant part of that colossal edifice, cheering on the Men of the Scarlet and Gray.  Michigan fans have experienced a tough and disappointing season, and many of them have put their tickets up for sale.  Ohio State fans have been very willing buyers.

What will happen?  The Wolverines have struggled this year, while the Buckeyes have won every game.  The statistics and records will tell you that Ohio State clearly has the better team and should win the game . . . but in The Game, records and statistics often don’t matter.  Fans of both teams who have watched The Game will remember surprising triumphs and devastating losses.  The shocks and upsets are what have made The Game the greatest rivalry game in college football.

Casual fans can be overconfident, but I don’t know of any true member of Buckeye Nation who is expecting an easy game tomorrow.  We know that it will be a tough, brutal battle, filled with bone-jarring hits and hard runs to pick up crucial first downs, and we’re starting to feel that surge of adrenalin as The Game draws nearer.

Let’s go, Bucks!

It’s Michigan Week! (II)

I would call the rivalry between Ohio State and Michigan during the week of The Game a friendly rivalry — except it really isn’t.  Deep down, every Buckeyes fan wants to crush Michigan like a cockroach.  We want to punish them, humiliate them, and leave them wailing forlornly to their misbegotten gods. Michigan fans share this perspective.

But, since we aren’t fighting with broadswords, we need to make do with humor.  When I was a kid, and Woody Hayes and Bo Schembechler were fighting the 10-Year War, the battle was waged with bumper stickers.  I remember one of the Michigan bumper stickers said:  “Save Fuel.  Burn Woody!”  And I thought — boy, Michigan fans are about as funny as, say, Jerry Lewis during the MDA telethon.

The Ohio side of the humor equation, however, isn’t appreciably better.  Consider these two representative efforts:

1.  “A University of Michigan fan walks into a doctor’s office and removes his hat to reveal a frog sitting on his head. The doctor asks, ‘How can I help you?’ The frog replies, ‘I was wondering if you could help me get this wart off my butt.'”

2.  “Two University of Michigan grads are laughing it up on their way into a bar.  The bartender asks:  ‘Hey, why are you guys so happy?’  One of the Wolverines says, ‘Well, to be honest with you, we’re proud of ourselves.  We just finished a puzzle in a week, and when we were done we noticed the box said 4 to 6 years.'”

In Ohio, we try to make our statements on the football field.

The Offense Rolls, But The Defense . . . .

Ohio State’s 52-34 win over Cal told us several things.

First, it told us that Ohio State has the best back-up quarterback in college football.  Kenny Guiton performed almost flawlessly, throwing for four touchdowns and 276 yards, rushing for 92 yards, and navigating the multi-faceted Buckeyes offense as it steamrolled the Cal defense.  Led by Jordan Hall, with three touchdowns and 168 yards, the ground game amassed 332 yards.  (Somewhere, Woody Hayes is smiling.)  A national TV audience also was introduced to lightning-quick Dontre Wilson, burner Devin Smith, who had a nifty three catches for 149 yards and two TDs, clutch receiver Corey Brown, who made a great end zone grab, and other offensive options.  The Golden Bears simply had no answer for the Buckeye offense, which put up more than 600 yards.

photo-96Second, we know that Urban Meyer has the soul of a riverboat gambler.  From the long bomb to start the Buckeye scoring, to the repeated decisions to go for it on fourth down, Meyer demonstrated a willingness to push his chips onto the table and count on his team to perform — and they did.  There will be fourth downs that the Buckeyes don’t convert, of course, but Coach Meyer has sent a message to the rest of the Big Ten:  don’t expect these team to play conservative offensive football.

Third, it’s clear that the defense needs a lot of work.  Cal has a high-powered offense, and you’re going to give up touchdowns and yards.  But what concerned me was the poor fundamentals, particularly in tackling.  From Bradley Roby’s desultory shove of a receiver who nevertheless tiptoed down the sideline to a score, to countless failures to wrap up, the defense showed it still has a long way to go.  Against a team that matches up better against the Buckeyes’ offense, one of those breakdowns could cost the Buckeyes the game.  From a talent level, the defense seems to have as many weapons as the offense, but the pieces haven’t been put together.  Next week against Florida A&M, I hope to see a tackling clinic.

Finally, we know that Buckeye Nation travels — and how!  From TV shots, it looked like the Cal Stadium was mostly clad in scarlet and gray.  I know that the fans had a blast too.  Thanks to Mr. Nesser, one of the traveling Buckeye Nation faithful, for sending me this photo of The Best Damn Band In The Land performing at the Hearst Greek Theater in Berkeley before the game.

At Woody’s Gravesite

When Michigan Week rolls around, members of Buckeye Nation naturally think of Wayne Woodrow Hayes, Ohio State’s iconic football coach who wanted — deeply, passionately, and unequivocally — to beat Michigan every year.

Recently I was near Columbus’ Union Cemetery.  It’s tucked right next to Route 315, one of the main thoroughfares that fans take to get to Ohio Stadium.  It’s also the location of Woody Hayes’ grave, and I decided to pay a visit.

Ohio State’s famous coach is buried next to his beloved wife, Anne, beneath a simple stone headstone in an unremarkable part of the cemetery.  His headstone, however, bears a memorable and beautiful quote:  “And in the night of death, hopes sees a star, and listening love hears the rustle of a wing.”

As befits Hayes — a much more interesting, multi-faceted man than the media caricatures of the fiery coach ever depicted — the evocative quote has an interesting back story.  It is a quote of Robert G. Ingersoll, a towering 19th century figure who is little remembered today.  Ingersoll was a brilliant and accomplished lawyer, politician — he famously described Republican James Blaine as the “plumed knight of Maine” — defender of Darwin and the theory of natural selection, and religious skeptic.

The entire quote from Ingersoll, attributed by the 1919 edition of Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations to Ingersoll’s statement At His Brother’s Gravereads:  “Life is a narrow vale between the cold and barren peaks of two eternities. We strive in vain to look beyond the heights. We cry aloud—and the only answer is the echo of our wailing cry. From the voiceless lips of the unreplying dead there comes no word. But in the night of Death Hope sees a star and listening Love can hear the rustling of a wing.”

What better expression of the frail needs of the human condition for reassurance when confronted with the deep void of death?  And what does it say about the purportedly knuckle-dragging football coach when he chooses such a quote to mark his place of eternal rest?

When I visited Woody Hayes’ grave, a fan had carefully placed tiny pieces of homemade candy, in the shape of Brutus Buckeye’s face, on the top of the headstone, and another admirer had perched a small, painfully cute stuffed bear wearing an Ohio State sweater on the front of the marker.  They were part of the graveside scene, next to a military marker and an American flag moving gently in the breeze.  As I stood there thinking of Coach Hayes, I couldn’t help but wonder whether those dedicated and well-meaning fans, perhaps, appreciated only a small fraction of a vast and complex spirit.

It’s Michigan Week, Bitches!

This week comes but once a year

When Buckeyes see their duty clear

And college football e’er bewitches

It’s Michigan Week, all you bitches!

And before this week shall pass

We’ll kick with glee Michigan ass

On Saturday at the Horseshoe

We’ll trounce the dismal Maize and Blue

And then a stein of beer we’ll raise

And toast to good old Woody Hayes

Then spray the ‘Shoe with chlorine

To rid the scent of Wolverine.

Let’s go, Bucks!

Happy Birthday, Coach Hayes

Today is the 98th anniversary of the birth date of Wayne Woodrow Hayes.

Coach Hayes was a man who lived an interesting life and left an indelible imprint on the Ohio State University and on the Columbus community.  Although people outside of Columbus often remember him for his volcanic temper and sideline tirades as much as for his success in coaching the Ohio State Buckeyes on the gridiron, many in Columbus fondly recall him as an intelligent, caring, and generous person who believed in community involvement and “paying forward” to others.  He was passionate about the Ohio State University and the value of getting an education from a school that he believed was second to none.  And while football was important, to be sure, Coach Hayes was by no means one-dimensional in his outlook or his interests.  He quoted Emerson, was an avid student of military history, and kept careful track of his players and urged them, repeatedly, to make the most of their degrees, their careers, and their lives.

People who did not know him now casually talk about “Woody.”  I prefer to think of him as Coach Hayes.  In Ohio, the title “Coach” is one of honor and respect.  Wayne Woodrow Hayes left a legacy that deserves both.

Jack Tatum

I was sorry to learn of the death of Jack Tatum today.  I was even sorrier to read stories that said that Tatum was “best known” for delivering the hit that paralyzed wide receiver Darryl Stingley.  It seems unfair for unfortunate one play to so define a player — particularly a player of Tatum’s caliber, for he unquestionably was one of the greatest players in the history of Ohio State football. 

Jack Tatum, who wore number 32 as a Buckeye, was one of the key players on the Ohio State teams in 1968, 1969, and 1970, including the undefeated team that won that national championship in 1968.  Although recruited to Ohio State by Woody Hayes as a running back, Tatum unselfishly switched to the defensive side of the ball and became one of the most fearsome, devastating tacklers college football as ever seen.  Tatum was as crucial to the Ohio State defense as Rex Kern was to the Ohio State offense of that era.

Tatum went on to pro football renown with the Oakland Raiders, but had health problems related to diabetes as he grew older.  One of his legs was amputated, and he was only 61 when he died.  He will be missed by his family, his friends, his former teammates, and Buckeye fans everywhere.

Welcome To Michigan Week

Saturday Ohio State and Michigan play for the 106th time. As has been the case for decades, their game is the last game of the season, and in Columbus, Ohio it is and will forever be The Game. According to Wikipedia, Michigan leads the series 57-42-6. Ohio State fans will say those numbers are a bit misleading, because Michigan dominated the early years of the series, encompassing the Fielding Yost era, 13-0-2. (The Wikipedia list of the results is here.)

I cut my teeth on The Game in the 1970s, when Woody Hayes and Bo Schembechler were locked in what came to be known as “The Ten-Year War.” It seemed as though each year the teams came to The Game with the Big Ten title on the line, and the results were low-scoring, brutally hard-hitting classics like the 10-10 tie in 1973. I remember that game well, because I had to work at Big Bear that day. Although Saturdays were normally our busiest day of the week, no one — and I mean no one — came to the Kingsdale Big Bear that day. We baggers were kept busy doing menial chores like mopping and shelving, and every so often we would try to find an excuse to visit the butcher shop at the back of the store, where they had The Game on the radio. The 10-10 tie was a bitter disappointment for Ohio State fans; I remember a picture of Woody Hayes walking off the field that day with an immensely sad and disappointed expression on his face. The next day, that game turned into an even bigger disappointment for Michigan fans because the Big Ten decided that Ohio State, rather than Michigan, should go to the Rose Bowl.

The Game is where legends are made and players can assure their legacy for all time. Fans remember the bitter defeats with crystalline clarity decades after they occurred. The tide of success in the series ebbs and flows. The 1990s, for example, were the long, dark night of the soul for Buckeyes fans. Michigan dominated the series during the Cooper era, going 10-2-1. More recently, Ohio State has come out on top more often than not.

This year, Michigan has had a tough season, and the Buckeyes will be favored. In The Game, however, you can throw the teams’ respective records out the window. Crazy things often happen, and sometimes the underdog that has nothing to lose plays their hearts out and brings home an improbable victory. I’m hoping that this is not one of those years.

Bring On The Trojans

Tomorrow night the Ohio State Buckeyes take on the USC Trojans in a clash of college football titans at Ohio Stadium. I am certain that many Ohio State fans are viewing the game with some trepidation, because Ohio State got waxed by the Men of Troy in L.A. last year, and Ohio State’s performance against Navy last week raises a lot of questions about Ohio State’s offensive and defensive lines. I am a football traditionalist who learned by watching Woody Hayes-coached teams.  I therefore believe that the vast majority of football games are won by the team that is better at blocking and tackling, with the toughness and technique to win the battle of the trenches. Ohio State’s offensive and defensive lines will have to play much better this week if Ohio State hopes to beat the Trojans.

Woody Hayes

Woody Hayes

Even if Ohio State loses, I am glad that the Athletic Department is scheduling teams like USC, Texas, and other quality opponents for regular season games. I think if you want to be viewed as a premier program you need to play a premier schedule and prove that you can compete with the best teams in the land. Lately Ohio State has struggled with elite non-Big 10 opponents, but that doesn’t mean it should shy away from such contests. Excellent teams welcome challenges and rise to meet them. Respect has to be earned, and a win over the Trojans would go a very long way toward repairing Ohio State’s damaged reputation among college football fans. I’ll be watching, and rooting, and somewhere I think Woody Hayes will be watching, too.

Long Overdue

Neal Colzie

Neal Colzie

The Ohio State University Men’s Varsity O Alumni Association recently announced that Neal Colzie will finally be inducted into the Ohio State Athletics Hall of Fame.  I’m amazed that Colzie, a legendary defensive back and kick returner, wasn’t named to the Hall of Fame years ago.

Colzie was one of the most memorable players on the great Ohio State football teams of the early 1970s.  He was fast, a powerful hitter and sure tackler, had great hands, and was a shifty, elusive runner who was tough to catch and bring down on a kick return or after an interception.  He made many big plays on a team filled with big-time players.  More important to me, as an impressionable teenager at the time, he clearly was one of the coolest guys on the team.  He looked cool, walked cool, acted cool, dressed cool, and — and this was not easy to do — was even cool when he appeared on The Woody Hayes Show.  Anyone who ever watched that show remembers the awkward staging and pregnant pauses as Coach Hayes brought on some fidgeting players and “interviewed” them.  Woody would ask them some softball questions about the game and then try to coax the right answers from some enormous, ill-at-ease, tongue-tied offensive lineman.  I remember Colzie having a bemused expression whenever he was on the show, as if he was enjoying the spectacle as much as anybody else.

I searched high and low for a better photo of Neal Colzie than the picture at left, but was unsuccessful.  He deserves a better picture, and he deserves to be included in the OSU Athletic Hall of Fame.